Author: Johan Jarl

Exciting Courses On Offer

We have a host of exciting courses on offer for 2022, including some new ones;

ANTH 3098 – The Archaeology of Resistance – explores how radical challenges to power structures are made through the perspectives, experiences, and material practices of activists, revolutionaries, and subaltern insurgent movements. Click here for more information.

ANTH 3095 – Technology and Society: Archaeological Perspectives – examines the concept of technology and in archaeological and more recent contexts, looking at relationships between ‘technology’ and ‘nature, and some of the ways that technologies are incorporated into our daily rituals, practice, and identity. Click here for more information.

ANTH 3720 – Archaeological and Forensic Science Lab Methods – Four different modules taking place over four different weekends. Each module is worth one credit, and you can take up to three. Module 1 is on R-statistics, module 2 is on Botany and Microscopy, module 3 is on Stable Isotopes, and module 4 is on Arch GIS. Click here for more information.

 

Virtual Talk on the John Hollister Site

The Archaeological Society of Connecticut and the Friends of the Office of State Archaeology are pleased to invite you to the third and final of our free virtual talks in the Fall 2021 series, this Wednesday, November 17, 2021, at 7:00 PM, when Dr. Sarah P. Sportman, Connecticut State Archaeologist, will present Archaeological Research at the 17th-Century John Hollister Site, South Glastonbury, 2016-2021.

The John Hollister Site (54-85) is a large 17th-century farm complex located on the fringe of early English settlement on the Connecticut River in present-day South Glastonbury, Connecticut.  The farm was occupied from about 1650 to 1711, first by members of the Gilbert family, who were tenant farmers, and later by the Hollisters.  The site was identified through oral history and remote sensing work that was carried out in 2015 and 2016.  Excavations at the site were conducted in the summers of 2016-2021 under the direction Connecticut State Archaeologists Brian Jones (2016-2018), Nicholas Bellantoni (2019) and Sarah Sportman (2021), with members of the Friends of the Office of State Archaeology, volunteers, and field school students. The Hollister Site includes at least six buried cellars, two wells, and numerous other subsurface features as well as large, well-preserved assemblages of artifacts and food remains.  This presentation will summarize the research conducted at the site to date, including new information from the 2021 field season.

Use this Zoom link to register:

https://us06web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_w26mLWMRSMSLSqu9xoKNmA

The link will also be posted on the Events page on the ASC website at www.ctarchaeology.org/upcoming-events

New Publication on Acheulian Armenia

Our graduate student Jayson Gill and colleagues recently published an article in the Journal of Paleolithic Archaeology entitled “The Techno-typological and 3D-GM Analysis of Hatis-1: a Late Acheulian Open-Air Site on the Hrazdan-Kotayk Plateau, Armenia”. Read it here.

Congratulations to Nardos Shiferaw!

Recently our 2nd year graduate student Nardos Shiferaw won a competitive grant from the Collaborative to Advance Equity through Research on Women & Girls of Color at UConn’s Africana Studies Institute. The grant will fund Nardos’ research project entitled “Structural Racism and Covid-19: Black Women’s Experiences of Health in Entwined Pandemics” – a pilot project where she will recruit Black women from immigrant backgrounds employed as essential workers to journal online with the Pandemic Journaling Project, then meet for follow-up interviews.

A luncheon was held on 10/27 in the Homer Babbidge Library to honor the recipients, and naturally we want to join in offering our congratulations!

Archaeological Science Weekend Courses

It’s that time of the year again where the Spring selection of courses have been made available! We are excited to announce that once again, among our other great courses, we are offering four weekend courses in archaeological science, each worth 1 credit. This year we are offering a statistics course using R, a microscopy and botany course, a table isotopes course, and a course on Arch GIS. This is a great opportunity to experience some practical scientific archaeology, learn a bit, and also earn a few credits while doing it! Check out the flier for more information or contact gideon.hartman@uconn.edu.

Alex Brittingham our latest PhD recipient

We would like to congratulate Alex Brittingham for a successful  defense of his PhD dissertation Research on September 23rd titled:  “Stable isotopes in the Southern Caucasus:  Modern Variability, Preservation and Archaeological Applications”.

Alex is a recipient of Lady Davis Post-Doctoral Fellowship at the Department of Earth Sciences and Institute of Archaeology the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.

He will join no less than four different funded international research projects in Israel, Armenia, Georgia, and Ethiopia.