Internship Opportunities

I. Anthropology Internship Program

Thank you for your interest in the anthropology internship program. This program is offered during the Fall and Spring semesters. It allows students to gain real life experience working in an anthropological field of their interest, while receiving academic credit.

Finding an internship. Students are welcome to find their own internships with an organization, agency, or business but all internships for which students wish to receive credit must be approved by your Anthropology advisor. Below we provide a list of possible internships, community partners, and internships that anthropology students have undertaken in the past to aid in your search. Students might also want to check out the UConn internship center (internships.uconn.edu), as they also have an extensive list of opportunities.

Signing up. To register, students must enroll in two courses:

  • ANTH 3091. Sign up for one credit of this class. This covers the academic component of the internship program. This one credit course is graded A–F, and requires that students write a 5–10 paper analyzing their internship from an anthropological perspective. (Faculty will provide instructions for this assignment at the start of the semester). Permission number required.
  • ANTH 3081. Sign up for between 1 and 6 credits of this class. This is the hourly component of the internship, and for each credit students must complete 42 hours of work at their internship. The number of credits is up to the student and advisor and/or the department Internship Coordinator. Grading is done S/U. Note: Students must specify the number of credits when they register otherwise it will default to one credit. Students can only use up to 6 internship credits towards the Anthropology major and only up to 15 internship credits towards the undergraduate degree. Permission number required.
  • Summer Internships: If students are interested in doing an internship over the summer, we recommend they sign up for the UNIV internship course offered through the office of Career Development.

 

Internship opportunities, community partners and organizations:

Active Internship Opportunities through Anthropology Department and Other Campus Programs

Study Abroad Internship Opportunities:

Study Abroad Internships in Anthropology:

Virtual Internships through Study Abroad:

 

Government Internship Programs (e.g., National Park Service):

Additional Internship possibilities:

Students are also encouraged to find their own internship by contacting programs.  Previous anthropology majors have interned in the following organizations, programs and offices:

  • Organizations where students with interests in Human Rights have previously interned: Lawyers without Borders, Hartford Community Court, Freedom House (Washington, DC), Witness (New York), UNESCO Student Ambassadors, Willimantic No Freeze Center, Uconn Law Asylum Clinic, International Rescue Committee  
  • Organizations where students with interests in Latino and Latin American Studies have previously interned: Hispanic Health Council, Latinos/as Contra SIDA, Inc., Windham Public Schools, Connecticut Children’s Medical Center, New England Farm Workers Council, ASPIRA of CT, Latino and Puerto Rican Affairs Commission for the State of CT, Bulkeley High School, Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives  
  • Organizations where students with interests in Linguistics have interned: Language Acquisition Research Center, Central Intelligence Agency, United Nations, Linguistic Society of America, University of Rochester  
  • Organizations where students with interests in Urban and Community Studies have interned: Urban Institute, D.C., American Red Cross, Green Corps, ConnPIRG, Connecticut State House and Senate, CT Dept. of Social Services, CT Judicial Dept., Hispanic Health Counsel, City of Hartford Planning Division, CT Dept. of Children and Families, City of Waterbury (various depts.), CT State Troopers
  • Additional Organizations where Anthropology majors have interned: Smithsonian, Museum of Natural History, Hartford Public Schools, Yale University Human Relations Area Files (HRAF), The Institute for American Indian Studies, local hospitals, various state government offices, community-based and nongovernment organizations.

II. Anthropology Directed Studies

Course options:

  • ANTH 3090. Directed Field Research in Anthropology: The investigation of a sociocultural and/or archaeological problem in some domestic or foreign field location.

1.00 – 12.00 credits | May be repeated for a total of 12 credits. Prerequisites: ANTH 3003 or consent of instructor. Grading Basis: Graded  Examples:

  • ANTH 3096. Directed Laboratory Research in Anthropology: The investigation of a sociocultural and/or archaeological problem in a laboratory-based setting. Hours by arrangement. Instructor consent required.

1.00 – 6.00 credits Prerequisites: Instructor consent required. Grading Basis: Graded

III. Anthropology Independent Studies

Course Options:

  • ANTH 3099. Independent Study: Research, archival, or text-based study of a specific topic with an instructor. Instructor approval required

1.00 – 6.00 credits | May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: None. Grading Basis: Graded