media coverage

Dimitris Xygalatas on Religion, Morality, and Psychology of Rituals

Dimitris XygalatasDimitris Xygalatas’ latest publications focus on the issues of morality and psychology of rituals. Professor Xygalatas is coauthor of a paper in the latest issue of Personality and Social Psychology Review entitled “The Psychology of Rituals: An Integrative Review and Process-Based Framework.” With growing interest among psychologists in rituals and the causal mechanisms of ritual behavior, this paper serves to “provide an organizing framework to understand recent empirical work from social psychology, cognitive science, anthropology, behavioral economics, and neuroscience.” In a second publication for the online media outlet The Conversation, Dimitris tackles patterns of distrust among religious people toward atheism and irreligious people, and the relationship between religious prejudice, morality, and belief. The Conversation is a not-for-profit media outlet for scientific and academic news, and reports a monthly online audience of 5.2 million users onsite, and reaches around 35 million people through “creative commons republication.” Dimitris Xygalatas is an Assistant Professor of Anthropology at UCONN.

Dr. Sarah Willen’s Research Featured by the Humanities Institute

UCONN’s Humanities Institute website has featured Dr. Sarah Willen’s research. Dr. Willen, a former fellow of the Humanities Institute, is an Assistant Professor of Anthropology and the Director of the Research Program on Global Health and Human Rights at the Human Rights Institute. Her research, which was partially supported by the Humanities Institute, focuses on health inequity and “health-related deservingness.” Click here for the full text of the featured article.

 

Sarah Willen

Kevin McBride’s Views on Metal Detectors in the New York Times

Anthropology Department faculty member Dr. Kevin McBride is an archaeologist specializing in the Native American history of Connecticut. He is also the director of research at the Mashantucket Pequot Museum. His work on the Pequot War of 1637 and his views on archaeologists’ use of metal detectors, a device commonly used by looters in illegal excavations, are featured in a recent New York Times article entitled “Archaeologists and Metal Detectorists Find Common Ground”.

Kevin McBride

Merrill Singer’s Climate Change Research on UCONN Today

Dr. Merrill Singer, professor of anthropology at UCONN, has partnered with Family Life Education to study the impact of climate change on low-income residents of Hartford and their awareness and understanding of climate change. The study, which was recently published in the journal Medical Anthropology, has been featured on UCONN Today.

 

Merrill Singer

Kroum’s Black Sea Underwater Archaeology Project Featured in NYT

Dr. Batchvarov Kroum, a professor of anthropology at UCONN and an underwater archaeologist, is co-director of a project that has unearthed a world of shipwrecks in the Black Sea. The ships date from the Byzantine and Ottoman empires to 19th century. This project’s impressive finds was recently featured in the New York Times.

 

Kroum Batchvarov

Anthropology Alumnus’ Ancient DNA Research Featured on the BBC

Nathan Wales, a recent alumnus of UCONN’s Department of Anthropology, is an ancient DNA specialist whose research was recently featured on the BBC. A postdoctoral fellow at the University of Copenhagen, Dr. Wales’ research uses DNA to study the origins and spread of domestic corn.

 

Nathan_Wales

Eleanor Ouimet’s Research in Japan Featured in UCONN Today

Anthropology Professor in Residence Eleanor Ouimet is member of an interdisciplinary team of UCONN professors who traveled to Japan to investigate natural disasters, namely tsunamis, and their aftermath from a number of angles. Their research has been featured in an article on UConn Today.

 

Elle Ouimet