Sarah Willen and Colleagues awarded NSF Grant

February 7, 2022

Congratulations to Sarah Willen and her colleagues at Brown University on being awarded a National Science Foundation (NSF) grant to address the impact of COVID-19 on first-generation college students and their families in the U.S. as part of their impactful Pandemic Journaling Project.

The new study is led by Dr. Katherine A. Mason (Brown University) with Dr. Andrea Flores (Brown University), and Dr. Sarah Willen (UConn) as Co-Principal Investigators. The study abstract, which is posted on the NSF website, reads as follows:

The Impact of Covid-19 on the Educational and Career Outcomes of First-Generation College Students and their Families

The Covid-19 pandemic has greatly disrupted the education of first-generation college students—those whose parents did not complete a college degree. These students and their parents are often low-income, racial/ethnic minorities, and/or of an immigrant background. Compared to other families, they have fewer resources to absorb the impact of the educational and social crises stemming from the pandemic, but also have more at stake in completing a college degree. In families of first-generation college students, parents and children strive together for individual and collective success based on the belief that higher education will advance the family’s economic mobility, improve their social status, and help them fulfill their obligations to each other. This research examines how the Covid-19 pandemic has affected the educational and life goals of first-generation college student families and the actions taken in support of these goals. The project findings, to be shared in public-facing documents and web-based formats including a public archive, informs university supports and social services for vulnerable learners and families. This project is jointly funded by Cultural Anthropology and the Established Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR).

The project hypothesizes that the Covid-19 pandemic has led first-generation college students and their families to prioritize caretaking actions aimed at immediate practical needs over the longer- term goals of better lives enabled by education. This hypothesis will be investigated through three years of data collection and analysis. Sixty parent-student pairs will each participate in: 1) two years of monthly journaling on the Pandemic Journaling Project (PJP) platform, created by two of the PIs in May 2020; 2) two one-on-one interviews with researchers; and 3) two interviews conducted between parent and student. These varied methods will capture families’ shifting thinking, goals, and actions in relation to education and well-being. Understanding these perspectives and choices will advance theories of how families seek to create meaningful lives through both education and caregiving in the wake of crisis.

 

New Book

February 1, 2022

Hot off the presses, a new book co-edited by Françoise Dussart.

Contemporary Indigenous Cosmologies and Pragmatics. University of Alberta Press, 2022

Edited by Françoise Dussart and Sylvie Poirier

In this timely collection, the authors examine Indigenous peoples’ negotiations with different cosmologies in a globalized world. Dussart and Poirier outline a sophisticated theory of change that accounts for the complexity of Indigenous peoples’ engagement with Christianity and other cosmologies, their own colonial experiences, as well as their ongoing relationships to place and kin. The contributors offer fine-grained ethnographic studies that highlight the complex and pragmatic ways in which Indigenous peoples enact their cosmologies and articulate their identity as forms of affirmation. This collection is a major contribution to the anthropology of religion, religious studies, and Indigenous studies worldwide.

Contributors: Anne-Marie Colpron, Robert R. Crépeau, Françoise Dussart, Ingrid Hall, Laurent Jérôme, Frédéric Laugrand, C. James MacKenzie, Caroline Nepton Hotte, Ksenia Pimenova, Sylvie Poirier, Kathryn Rountree, Antonella Tassinari, Petronella Vaarzon-Morel

For more information click here.

Archaeological Site in CT Older than 10,000 Years!

January 18, 2022

Check out this excellent article on the Brian D. Jones site in Avon, CT, dated to 12,5000 years old, and read what some of our UConn Anthropology Alumni working on the site have to say. The CT Insider article can be found here.

Exciting Courses On Offer

January 14, 2022

We have a host of exciting courses on offer for 2022, including some new ones;

ANTH 3098 – The Archaeology of Resistance – explores how radical challenges to power structures are made through the perspectives, experiences, and material practices of activists, revolutionaries, and subaltern insurgent movements. Click here for more information.

ANTH 3095 – Technology and Society: Archaeological Perspectives – examines the concept of technology and in archaeological and more recent contexts, looking at relationships between ‘technology’ and ‘nature, and some of the ways that technologies are incorporated into our daily rituals, practice, and identity. Click here for more information.

ANTH 3720 – Archaeological and Forensic Science Lab Methods – Four different modules taking place over four different weekends. Each module is worth one credit, and you can take up to three. Module 1 is on R-statistics, module 2 is on Botany and Microscopy, module 3 is on Stable Isotopes, and module 4 is on Arch GIS. Click here for more information.

 

Medical Anthropology Conference Recording Available

December 14, 2021

On May 17 2021 Françoise Dussart co-organized, alongside Sohyun Park, an interdisciplinary conference entitled Design and Research for Healthy Communities and Healthcare Facilities. The record of this conference is still available and will be until next year, and can be found here.

Virtual Talk on the John Hollister Site

November 17, 2021

The Archaeological Society of Connecticut and the Friends of the Office of State Archaeology are pleased to invite you to the third and final of our free virtual talks in the Fall 2021 series, this Wednesday, November 17, 2021, at 7:00 PM, when Dr. Sarah P. Sportman, Connecticut State Archaeologist, will present Archaeological Research at the 17th-Century John Hollister Site, South Glastonbury, 2016-2021.

The John Hollister Site (54-85) is a large 17th-century farm complex located on the fringe of early English settlement on the Connecticut River in present-day South Glastonbury, Connecticut.  The farm was occupied from about 1650 to 1711, first by members of the Gilbert family, who were tenant farmers, and later by the Hollisters.  The site was identified through oral history and remote sensing work that was carried out in 2015 and 2016.  Excavations at the site were conducted in the summers of 2016-2021 under the direction Connecticut State Archaeologists Brian Jones (2016-2018), Nicholas Bellantoni (2019) and Sarah Sportman (2021), with members of the Friends of the Office of State Archaeology, volunteers, and field school students. The Hollister Site includes at least six buried cellars, two wells, and numerous other subsurface features as well as large, well-preserved assemblages of artifacts and food remains.  This presentation will summarize the research conducted at the site to date, including new information from the 2021 field season.

Use this Zoom link to register:

https://us06web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_w26mLWMRSMSLSqu9xoKNmA

The link will also be posted on the Events page on the ASC website at www.ctarchaeology.org/upcoming-events

New Publication on Acheulian Armenia

November 8, 2021

Our graduate student Jayson Gill and colleagues recently published an article in the Journal of Paleolithic Archaeology entitled “The Techno-typological and 3D-GM Analysis of Hatis-1: a Late Acheulian Open-Air Site on the Hrazdan-Kotayk Plateau, Armenia”. Read it here.

Congratulations to Nardos Shiferaw!

October 29, 2021

Recently our 2nd year graduate student Nardos Shiferaw won a competitive grant from the Collaborative to Advance Equity through Research on Women & Girls of Color at UConn’s Africana Studies Institute. The grant will fund Nardos’ research project entitled “Structural Racism and Covid-19: Black Women’s Experiences of Health in Entwined Pandemics” – a pilot project where she will recruit Black women from immigrant backgrounds employed as essential workers to journal online with the Pandemic Journaling Project, then meet for follow-up interviews.

A luncheon was held on 10/27 in the Homer Babbidge Library to honor the recipients, and naturally we want to join in offering our congratulations!

Archaeological Science Weekend Courses

October 27, 2021

It’s that time of the year again where the Spring selection of courses have been made available! We are excited to announce that once again, among our other great courses, we are offering four weekend courses in archaeological science, each worth 1 credit. This year we are offering a statistics course using R, a microscopy and botany course, a table isotopes course, and a course on Arch GIS. This is a great opportunity to experience some practical scientific archaeology, learn a bit, and also earn a few credits while doing it! Check out the flier for more information or contact gideon.hartman@uconn.edu.