Prof. Sarah Willen recently interviewed for UConnToday

November 16, 2020

The Pandemic Journaling project, co-founded by Professor Sarah Willen was recently featured on UConnToday. The Pandemic Journaling Project was created last may, and is a way for people all over the world to document their experiences during this unprecedented time. The Pandemic Journaling Projects goal is to make sure that ordinary people struggling through this pandemic have their voices heard, and their experiences remembered. This project will serve as a resource for researchers studying how the pandemic has impacted peoples lives. UConn Today interviewed Dr. Willen and members of her team about the project, which you can read more about here.

Dr. Willen is an associate professor here in the department of anthropology. She is also the Director of Research Program on Global Health and Human Rights at UConn’s Human Rights Institute. To learn more about the Pandemic Journaling Project and the unique role that it plays in the documentation of history, be sure to check out the project’s website and start your journal today.

We are Hiring!

November 6, 2020

The University of Connecticut’s College of Liberal Arts and Sciences invites applications for four positions at the level of Assistant Professor as part of a cluster hire in the Environment and Human Interactions. This initiative also includes two appointments at the Associate or Full Professor level. The Department of Anthropology is particularly interested in candidates whose research, teaching, activism, and community engagement activities are inherently inter-disciplinary and address specific drivers of human impacts of climate change, as well as the environmental impacts of current human behavior at local and global scales. Focus areas could include community-level disaster preparedness strategies, risk assessment and vulnerability to natural hazards, environmental links with our planet’s health, natural resource management, environmental injustice, and/or long-term environmental sustainability.

This cluster hire promotes meaningful engagement among physical, natural and social scientists through the potential for collaborative teaching, research, and outreach initiatives. Individuals should have research and teaching interests focused on one or more of the following areas: Analytical/Environmental Chemistry, Marine Sciences/Oceanography, Geography, Environmental Anthropology, Environmental Politics and Sustainability, Environmental Policy, and/or Environmental Inequalities and Justice. The successful candidate will be expected to establish and maintain a strong program of research and publication. Applicants may be hired in the following departments: Anthropology, Chemistry, Geography, Marine Sciences, Political Science, Public Policy, and/or Sociology.

For more information and instructions on how to apply at the Assistant Professor level please visit: https://academicjobsonline.org/ajo/jobs/17334

 

For more information and instructions on how to apply at the Associate or Full Professor level please visit: https://academicjobsonline.org/ajo/jobs/17339

Evaluation of applicants will begin December 15, 2020 and applications will be accepted until the position is filled. Any questions regarding this position should be directed to one of the co-chairs of the hiring committee: Eric Brunner (eric.brunner@uconn.edu) or Julie Granger (julie.granger@uconn.edu).

Dr. Haile Eshe Cole featured on UConn Today

November 4, 2020

UConn Anthropology faculty member Dr. Haile Eshe Cole’s research was recently featured on UConn Today. Dr. Cole’s research centers around how
racism negatively impacts the maternal health of black women. You can learn more about her research here: https://today.uconn.edu/2020/11/uconn-researcher-works-address-racisms-deadly-impact-black-mothers-babies/ or by enrolling in her Spring 2021 course titled: AFRA/ANTH 3320 Race, Culture, and Reproductive Health.

Dr. César Abadia receives SCHARP award

October 27, 2020

Dr, César Abadía-Barrero was recently awarded a SCHARP award for his project titled “Healing the Land to Attain Peace: A Community-Based Art Project in Rural Colombia”. This project aims to foster a community-led art and ethnographic exhibit of current efforts to build peace in an intercultural rural village of mestizo farmers and two indigenous groups (Uitoto Jurama and Coreguaje) located in Caquetá-Colombia. Through a series of Participatory Action Research (PAR) workshops, a group of 12 people will be trained in photography and “popular ethnography” and will be asked to capture in images and text what Buen Vivir (roughly translated from Andean indigenous languages as Good Living or Living Beautifully) means for them, if and how Buen Vivir was affected by the armed conflict, and how Buen Vivir can help build a long-lasting peace.

Solidarity with Black Lives Matter

July 7, 2020

UConn Department of Anthropology Solidarity Statement with Black Lives Matter

The Department of Anthropology of the University of Connecticut joins the UConn community in proclaiming Black Lives Matter. We stand with the Black community against systemic racism and ongoing police brutality. We mourn with the family, friends, and communities of Black people who have lost their lives to racism and police violence, including George Floyd, David McAtee, Atatiana Jefferson, Tony McDade, Ahmaud Arbery, Eric Garner, Breonna Taylor, Kathryn Johnston, Ayiana Stanley-Jones, Michael Brown, Trayvon Martin, Tamir Rice, Alton Sterling, Freddie Gray, Philando Castile, Sandra Bland, John Crawford III, Oscar Grant, and countless others whose names are not as well known. We also recognize that the Black community, along with Latinx and Native American communities, are disproportionately burdened by the COVID-19 pandemic because of the long and ongoing history of structural racism.

We commit to being strong and vocal allies who confront racism, injustice, and discrimination wherever it occurs in society, including within our discipline. We commit to practice anthropological research that is anti-racist and against all forms of discrimination and to work to improve the lives of Native American, Black, Latinx, and other marginalized populations with whom we work. And we reaffirm our commitment to anti-racist pedagogy as we dedicate ourselves to educating and empowering UConn students to become agents of change in our collective struggle for a just future.

Our department will take action immediately by assembling an anti-racism curriculum of anthropology courses for dissemination to the UConn student body and making race a mandatory topic for our Fall 2020 introductory courses. We pledge further action in the Fall semester by forming a committee of faculty and graduate students to identify and implement strategies to address racial disparity.  These strategies include, but are not limited to 1) reviewing and revising our course offerings and syllabi on race, racism, white supremacy, white privilege, and the experiences of Black people and other communities of color in the United States and globally, 2) increasing our recruitment of graduate and undergraduate students of color and making our department more welcoming to students from diverse backgrounds, 3) continuing our efforts to recruit and hire more faculty of color and providing them with mentorship to advance their careers and scholarship. We will disseminate an annual report on our efforts, recommendations, and outcomes on our department Web site and to the wider UConn community.

 

We endorse these statements from UConn’s Institutes/Centers:

Statement from Centers, Institutes and Programs on Racial Justice:

https://humanrights.uconn.edu/2020/06/05/statement-from-centers-institutes-and-programs-on-racial-justice/

 

Public Statement on Anti-Black Violence from Africana Studies Institute:

https://africana.uconn.edu/public-statement-on-anti-black-violence/

 

Joint Statement from the Thomas J. Dodd Research Center and Human Rights Institute:

https://humanrights.uconn.edu/2020/06/05/joint-statement-from-the-dodd-center-and-human-rights-institute/

 

In solidarity,

 

Department of Anthropology (Faculty, Graduate Students and Staff), University of Connecticut

July 3, 2020.

 

Anti-Racism Curriculum, Fall 2020

As part of the Department of Anthropology’s core commitment to educate and empower UConn students to become agents of change in our collective struggle for a more just future, we present our anti-racism curriculum for Fall 2020. Our 13 introductory and upper-division undergraduate and one graduate courses focus on or integrate critical components on race, anti-racism and related topics, including postcolonialism, social and health inequalities, power relations, hate speech, resistance, and social justice, among many others. We invite you to engage, contribute and become actors in overturning deeply entrenched race-based injustices.

 

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3 Anthropology Students Named 2019 University Scholars

October 15, 2019

The UConn Department of Anthropology would like to congratulate Luke Anderson, Daniel McCloskey, and Srishti Sadhir on being accepted to the 2019 University Scholars program for undergraduate students at the University of Connecticut. The University Scholar program is a competitive program that allows for undergraduate students to design and build an in-depth study surrounding projects relating to their individual interests. Students work with faculty members in order to create innovative project ideas that have a global impact.

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Dr. Deborah Bolnick recognized by the Anthropology section of AAAS

September 19, 2019

The department of Anthropology at UConn would like to congratulate our very own Dr. Deborah Bolnick for being the 2020 recipient of the Robert W. Sussman Award for Scientific Contributions to the field of Anthropology. The Anthropology section of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) established this award to recognize the accomplishments of mid-career anthropological scientists in the field of Anthropology.  The AAAS cites Dr. Bolnick’s contributions to the science of anthropological genetics as both insightful and prolific.