Author: Lang Martin

New paper about environmental cues and fairness

It Depends Who Is Watching You: 3-D Agent Cues Increase Fairness


Jan Krátký, John J. McGraw, Dimitris Xygalatas, Panagiotis Mitkidis, Paul Reddish

god

Laboratory and field studies have demonstrated that exposure to cues of intentional agents in the form of eyes can increase prosocial behavior. However, previous research mostly used 2-dimensional depictions as experimental stimuli. Thus far no study has examined the influence of the spatial properties of agency cues on this prosocial effect. To investigate the role of dimensionality of agency cues on fairness, 345 participants engaged in a decision-making task in a naturalistic setting. The experimental treatment included a 3-dimensional pseudo-realistic model of a human head and a 2-dimensional picture of the same object. The control stimuli consisted of a real plant and its 2-D image. Our results partly support the findings of previous studies that cues of intentional agents increase prosocial behavior…..


D. Xygalatas’ research on moralistic gods published in Nature

Moralistic gods, supernatural punishment and the expansion of human sociality


Benjamin Grant Purzycki, Coren Apicella, Quentin D. Atkinson, Emma Cohen, Rita Anne McNamara, Aiyana K. Willard, Dimitris Xygalatas, Ara Norenzayan & Joseph Henrich

moralistic gods

Since the origins of agriculture, the scale of human cooperation and societal complexity has dramatically expanded. This fact challenges standard evolutionary explanations of prosociality because well-studied mechanisms of cooperation based on genetic relatedness, reciprocity and partner choice falter as people increasingly engage in fleeting transactions with genetically unrelated strangers in large anonymous groups. To explain this rapid expansion of prosociality, researchers have proposed several mechanisms. Here we focus on one key hypothesis: cognitive representations of gods as increasingly knowledgeable and punitive, and who sanction violators of interpersonal social norms, foster and sustain the expansion of cooperation, trust and fairness towards co-religionist strangers….


Course development grant awarded to S. Willen and R. Sosis

Sarah WillenRichard SosisThe Center for Judaic Studies and Contemporary Jewish Life invited proposals for new undergraduate course development grants in all fields, areas, and periods related to Judaic Studies. Congratulations to our successful applicants Sarah S. Willen (Assistant Professor & Director, Research Program on Global Health and Human Rights) and Richard Sosis (James Barnett Professor of Humanistic Anthropology), who will share an award and develop an anthropology course, and Andrea Celli (Assistant Professor, Italian and Mediterranean Studies), who will develop a course on Medieval Italian Literature. Grant awardees will receive $2,000 in funding to support course development. Congratulations!

Ground Penetrating Radar Project by Peter Leach

 

Peter Leach
(Photo: Jerrey Roberts/Gazettenet)

Ground-penetrating radar used to prepare for archaeological dig at Amherst Historical Museum

AMHERST — A high-altitude Peruvian rock shelter, Mayan ruins and caves in France are among the sites around the world where a three-wheeled device resembling an oversized tricycle has revealed what lurks below the ground’s surface.
While the lawn of the Amherst Historical Museum on Amity Street may not be the most unusual place that Peter Leach has brought his ground-penetrating radar, it was where the doctoral student in anthropology at the University of Connecticut spent his day on Monday. “The idea is to use this to figure out how the entire property is laid out, slicing back through time,” Leach said. Making 50-centimeter-wide swaths over much of the ¾-acre property, Leach began the process of discovering what might be hidden up to 6 feet underground, without the need to put any shovels in the lawns and gardens surrounding the mid-18th-century building…

 

To read more, continue to Gazettenet.com.

12/6 Museum lecture: Ancient Human Evolution

 

adler
(Photo: Peter Morenus/UConn Photo)

Ancient Human Evolution During the Late Middle Pleistocene in Armenia

The Late Middle Pleistocene (130,000–425,000years ago) was a period of profound biological and behavioral change among ancient humans that witnessed the evolution of our species, Homo sapiens in Africa and our close cousins the Neanderthals in Eurasia. These biological changes were accompanied by important changes in stone tool technology, most notably the gradual replacement of large cutting tools and hand axes by tools produced by an innovative flaking method. During 2008 and 2009, Dr. Adler and his team excavated over 3,000 artifacts produced by both methods. These artifacts chart the earliest transition from the Lower Palaeolithic to the Middle Palaeolithic between 325,000–335,000 years ago. These results are significant because they support the idea that changes in human technology resulted from a common technological ancestry rather than the expansion from Africa of a particular human species armed with a new innovative technology.

The Connecticut State Museum of Natural History, part of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at UConn, presents “Ancient Human Evolution During the Late Middle Pleistocene in Armenia,” a lecture by Dr. Daniel Adler, UConn Department of Anthropology. The lecture will be held at the Connecticut State Museum of Natural History on the UConn Storrs Campus, Sunday, December 6, at 1 pm.

This program is free and advanced registration is not required. For more information, contact: Natural History Museum at 860.486.4460

UCONN Anthropology at 114th AAA Annual Meeting

Faculty and graduates from UConn Anthropology presenting at 114th AAA Annual Meeting November 18-22, 2015

 

Chaired sessions
Samuel Martinez
“NOWHERE”: LABOR AND RESIDENCE IN THE PLACELESS SPACES OF MODERNITY
Friday, 01:45 PM – 03:30 PM

Richard Wilson
5-0380 REGIMES OF PROOF: CRIME SCENES AND THE FORENSICS OF ANTHROPOLOGY
Saturday, November 21, 2015: 10:15 AM-12:00 PM

 

Round table discussions
Cesar Abadia-Barrero
3-1335 THE RIGHT TO HEALTH IN PRACTICE: LESSONS AND CHALLENGES FOR ETHNOGRAPHIC ENGAGEMENT
Thursday, November 19, 2015: 4:00 PM-5:45 PM

Richard Colon
PROMOTING GENDER EQUALITY ON FAMILIAR GROUND: ANTHROPOLOGISTS ADDRESSING CAMPUS SEXUAL ASSAULT
Time: Friday November 20, 2015. 8:00 am – 9:45 am

Sarah Willen
CONSIDERING ANTHROPOLOGY’S ROLE IN MEDICAL HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL MEDICINE: PROGRAMS, IDEAS, METHODS AND PRACTICE (PART 1)
Saturday, 08:00 AM – 09:45 AM

Richard Wilson
4-1210 THE FAMILIAR/STRANGE TROPES OF SEXUAL VIOLENCE: AN ETHNOGRAPHIC EXPLORATION OF ITS KINSHIP, POLITICS AND LAW
Friday, November 20, 2015: 4:00 PM-5:45 PM

 

Talks:
Sara Ailshire:
50922 Standard(s) of Care: Dignity and the Anthropology of Short Term Medical Missions
Friday, November 20, 2015: 4:45 PM
Panel: 21st CENTURY SHORT-TERM MEDICAL MISSIONS: STRANGE RETELLINGS OF FAMILIAR STORIES

Catherine Buerger
46489 The Politics of Inclusion: Human Rights Participation and Political Subjectivity in Ghana
Friday, November 20, 2015: 4:15 PM
Panel: ADMINISTRATION, GOVERNANCE AND CITIZENSHIP

Melissa Chiovenda
54265 The Reproduction and Transmission of Cultural Trauma: The Case of Afghanistan’s Hazaras
Friday, November 20, 2015: 5:15 PM
Panel: STRANGERS TO SOCIETY

Anne Kohler
52064 Erring on the Side of Humanity: Accessing Experience and Relationality in the Context of Growth Attenuation
Friday, November 20, 2015: 8:15 AM
Panel: ACCESS, CAPACITY, AND THE HUMAN

Shir Lerman
52434 Stigmatized Bodies and Stigmatized Identities: Obesity and Depression Stigma in Puerto Rico
Sunday, November 22, 2015: 11:15 AM
Panel: THE BIOSOCIOCULTURAL TRAJECTORY OF STIGMA

Joy Ciofi (Messerschmidt)
51270 The Color of Money Is Red: Selling Potentiality through Visual Landscapes at Mega-Casinos
Thursday, November 19, 2015: 10:45 AM
Panel: VISUALITIES: INTERVENTIONS, METHODS AND ANALYSIS

Rebecca Lee Nelson:
45062 Tensions Between Cosmopolitanism and Cultural Management in a Guatemalan Volunteer Tourism Program
Thursday, November 19, 2015: 10:45 AM
Panel: RETHINKING COSMOPOLITANISM: TOURISM AND TOURISTS IN A POST-HEGELIAN AGE

Sarah Willen
Shattering Culture and Revamping Medical Education in the United States
Saturday, 04:00 PM – 05:45 PM
Panel: UN-FAMILIAR SUBJECTS: A PANEL IN HONOR OF BYRON J. GOOD AND MARY-JO DELVECCHIO GOOD.

Download program as AAA2015

Alex Brittingham received Richard Hay Student Paper Award

Our Old World Archaeology graduate student Alex Brittingham received last week the prestigious “Richard Hay Student Paper Award” given annually for the best student presentation or poster in archaeological geology at the annual Geological Society of America Meeting. The awarded presentation was titled: “Late Pleistocene Paleoclimate Reconstruction at Lusakert Cave, Armenia.” Congratulations Alex!
 
 
Alex Brittngham


Sarah S. Willen on migration and health

UCONN Anthropology faculty Sarah S. Willen with a collective of authors just published a new article in Social Science and Medicine about migration as a social determinant of health.

Migration as a social determinant of health for irregular migrants: Israel as case study


Yonina Fleischman, Sarah S. Willen, Nadav Davidovitch, Zohar Mor

More than 150,000 irregular migrants reside in Israel, yet data regarding their utilization of and perceived barriers to health care services are limited. Drawing on semi-structured interviews conducted with 35 irregular migrant adults between January and September 2012, this article analyzes the role of migration as a social determinant of health for irregular migrants, and especially asylum seekers. We analyze two kinds of barriers faced by migrants when they attempt to access health care services: barriers resulting directly from their migration status, and barriers that are common among low-income communities but exacerbated by this status. Migration-related barriers included a lack of clear or consistent legislation; the threat of deportation; the inability to obtain work permits and resulting poverty and harsh living and working conditions; and discrimination. Barriers exacerbated by migrant status included prohibitive cost; poor and confusing organization of services; language barriers; perceived low quality of care; and social isolation. These findings support recent arguments that migrant status itself constitutes a social determinant of health that can intersect with other determinants to adversely affect health care access and health outcomes. Findings suggest that any meaningful effort to improve migrants’ health will depend on the willingness of clinicians, public health officials, and policymakers to address the complex array of upstream political and socio-economic factors that affect migrants’ health rather than focusing on narrower questions of access to health care.

Interview with Françoise Dussart about Australian indigenous art

Lifelines: Indigenous Contemporary Art from Australia
You are warmly invited to the exhibition about contemporary art in Australia called Lifelines at Musée de la civilisation. Lifelines abounds in life and color, its close to 100 works specially selected by guest curator Professor Françoise Dussart of the University of Connecticut.