Zooarchaeology

Jackie Meier Awarded Post-Doctoral Position at Trent University

Congratulations to our very own Jackie Meier, who has been awarded an SSHRC-funded post-doctoral position at Trent University! She will split her time between Canada and Bordeaux to study the fauna from a Neanderthal cave site in southern France. Jackie Will be defending her doctoral dissertation on April 17th, 2017.

 

Jackie Meier

Jackie Meier on the Ritual Neolithic Site of Kfar HaHoresh

Jackie Meier, a Ph.D. Candidate at UCONN’s Department of Anthropology, is the lead author on a PLoS One Paper entitled Provisioning the Ritual Neolithic Site of Kfar HaHoresh, Israel at the Dawn of Animal Management.

Abstract of the Paper:

It is widely agreed that a pivotal shift from wild animal hunting to herd animal management, at least of goats, began in the southern Levant by the Middle Pre-Pottery Neolithic B period (10,000–9,500 cal. BP) when evidence of ritual activities flourished in the region. As our knowledge of this critical change grows, sites that represent different functions and multiple time periods are needed to refine the timing, pace and character of changing human-animal relationships within the geographically variable southern Levant. In particular, we investigate how a ritual site was provisioned with animals at the time when herd management first began in the region. We utilize fauna from the 2010–2012 excavations at the mortuary site of Kfar HaHoresh—the longest continuous Pre-Pottery Neolithic B faunal sequence in the south Levantine Mediterranean Hills (Early–Late periods, 10,600–8,700 cal. BP). We investigate the trade-off between wild and domestic progenitor taxa and classic demographic indicators of management to detect changes in hunted animal selection and control over herd animal movement and reproduction. We find that ungulate selection at Kfar HaHoresh differs from neighboring sites, although changes in dietary breadth, herd demographics and body-size data fit the regional pattern of emerging management. Notably, wild ungulates including aurochs and gazelle are preferentially selected to provision Kfar HaHoresh in the PPNB, despite evidence that goat management was underway in the Mediterranean Hills. The preference for wild animals at this important site likely reflects their symbolic significance in ritual and mortuary practice.

 

Jackie Meier

A.Petrillo was awarded Kenyon Fellowship honorable mention

A big congratulations to graduate student, Ashley Petrillo who was awarded an Honorable Mention for the prestigious Dienje Kenyon Fellowship at the Society of American Archaeology Annual Meeting in Orlando last weekend. The Kenyon honors outstanding female students in zooarchaeology.
 
Ashley PetrilloDIENJE KENYON FELLOWSHIP HONORABLE MENTION
Recipient: Ashley N. Petrillo
 
Ashley Petrillo has developed an engaging research proposal on ‘The Development of Dairying Economies in the Southern Levant.’ This study will focus on the nature of dairying and the use of secondary products from the Chalcolithic Period to the Early Bronze Age (c. 4 000-2000 B.C.E. ) which is critical to understanding the rise of social complexity. Milk provided a storable and sustainable source of nutrient rich protein and fats (cheese and yogurt) that could be traded and transported. She will select an array of sheep, goat, and cow dentin samples to conduct stable isotope analyses to explore human weaning and management strategies during this important period of developing complexity. This award hereby acknowledges the importance of her proposed research and its future success.

Natalie Munro’s lab in UConn Today

UCONN Today published a report about Natalie Munro’s laboratory at the UConn Anthropology department.
 

Munro in lab
A Bare Bones Approach to Understanding Human Behavior

The laboratory of UConn anthropologist Natalie Munro is a treasure trove of animal bones. She has assembled the collection for teaching students how to identify everything from the species and age of the animal to how it died. Diversity of specimens is critical for that education, and Munro has been creative about amassing a rich collection. Interspersed between the bleached remains of animals tens of thousands of years old from distant digs are newer specimens from closer to home – roadkill both collected and donated…